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A Person Aspiring to Know More

Bio Across the sea of space, the stars are other suns 💫

Website http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/tyson/read/2007/04/02/the-cosmic-perspective

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image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "It is common knowledge that the sun is much larger than Earth...but how much larger? 
The Sun is 846,400mi in diameter, " - 1629195975994063193
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It is common knowledge that the sun is much larger than Earth...but how much larger? The Sun is 846,400mi in diameter, compared to the Earth that’s about 109 time’s larger. Weighing about 333,000 times that of planet Earth, when it comes down to it approximately 1,300,000 Earth’s can fit inside the sun.

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image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "Incredibly, magnetism is everywhere in the cosmos: planets, stars, gaseous nebulae, entire galaxies and the overall univ" - 1597277431982335608
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Incredibly, magnetism is everywhere in the cosmos: planets, stars, gaseous nebulae, entire galaxies and the overall universe are all magnetic...But while the Earth has a molten core to carry these currents, our galaxy's magnetism is powered by uncounted numbers of electrons, slowly drifting in formation through space.

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image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "Pulsars are spherical, compact objects that are about the size of a large city but contain more mass than the sun. Scien" - 1592258054488755936
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Pulsars are spherical, compact objects that are about the size of a large city but contain more mass than the sun. Scientists are using pulsars to study extreme states of matter, search for planets beyond Earth's solar system and measure cosmic distances. Pulsars radiate two steady, narrow beams of light in opposite directions. Although the light from the beam is steady, pulsars appear to flicker because they also spin. It's the same reason a lighthouse appears to blink when seen by a sailor on the ocean: As the pulsar rotates, the beam of light may sweep across the Earth, then swing out of view, then swing back around again. To an astronomer on the ground, the light goes in and out of view, giving the impression that the pulsar is blinking on and off. The reason a pulsar's light beam spins around like a lighthouse beam is that the pulsar's beam of light is typically not aligned with the pulsar's axis of rotation. Although most pulsars should have enough self-gravity to spin as fast as 3000 times per second before they split apart, all of the previously discovered millisecond pulsars, of which there are 150 or so, spin slower than 700 Hz.

image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "Neutron stars are one of my favorite things in the universe. They are the byproduct of stars that've gone supernova, wit" - 1587853828568275763
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Neutron stars are one of my favorite things in the universe. They are the byproduct of stars that've gone supernova, with the outer layers stripped away from the explosion, leaving only the core. This core can potentially become a neutron star. They are one of the densest objects in the universe. The stars are generally around the size of a city, however most are 1.4 times the mass of the sun. science

image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "A fun time with a group of friends. I hope everyone got to experience the eclipse as well! 
#physics #astrophysics #spac" - 1586471315279108093
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A fun time with a group of friends. I hope everyone got to experience the eclipse as well!

image by A Person Aspiring to Know More (@physics.in.the.universe) with caption : "Ever heard of a Magnetar? Well you should have!
Magnetars are the byproduct of stars that have gone supernova, generally" - 1584992785655554444
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Ever heard of a Magnetar? Well you should have! Magnetars are the byproduct of stars that have gone supernova, generally the core will turn into a neutron star. However, on some occasions, the core can become a Magnetar. You may guess from the name that they're especially magnetic: up to 1 quadrillion gauss. That's 1,000 trillion times stronger than the magnetic field you're sitting in right now. That puts magnetars in the No. 1 spot, reigning champions in the universal Strongest Magnetic Field competition. The numbers are there, but it's hard to wrap our brains around them. Those fields are strong enough to wreak havoc on their local environments. You know how atoms are made of a positively charged nucleus surrounded by negatively charged electrons? Those charges respond to magnetic fields. Not very much under normal conditions, but this ain't Kansas anymore, is it, Toto? Any unlucky atoms stretch into pencil-thin rods near these magnetars. It doesn't stop there. With the atoms all screwed up, normal molecular chemistry is just a no-go. Covalent bonds? Ha! And the magnetic fields can drive enormous bursts of high-intensity radiation. So, generally bad business. Get too close to one (say, within 1,000 kilometers, or about 600 miles), and the magnetic fields are strong enough to upset not just your bioelectricity — rendering your nerve impulses hilariously useless — but your very molecular structure. In a magnetar's field, you just kind of…dissolve. Thank you to Paul Sutter for the in-depth info!