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NASA

Bio Explore the universe and discover our home planet with the official NASA Instagram account

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National Geographic (@natgeo) Instagram Profile Photo natgeo

National Geographic

Hubble Space Telescope (@nasahubble) Instagram Profile Photo nasahubble

Hubble Space Telescope

National Geographic Travel (@natgeotravel) Instagram Profile Photo natgeotravel

National Geographic Travel

International Space Station (@iss) Instagram Profile Photo iss

International Space Station

SpaceX (@spacex) Instagram Profile Photo spacex

SpaceX

Elon Musk (@elonmusk) Instagram Profile Photo elonmusk

Elon Musk

NASA (@nasa) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by NASA (@nasa)

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "When galaxies collide — a common event in the universe — a fresh burst of star formation typically takes place as gas cl" - 1722198531849978779
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When galaxies collide — a common event in the universe — a fresh burst of star formation typically takes place as gas clouds mash together. At this point, the galaxy has a blue hue, but the color does not mean it is cold: it is a result of the intense heat of newly formed blue–white stars. Those stars do not last long, and after a few billion years the reddish hues of aging, smaller stars dominate an elliptical galaxy's spectrum. Our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) caught sight of a soft, diffuse-looking galaxy, perhaps the aftermath of a long-ago galactic collision when two spiral galaxies, each perhaps much like the Milky Way, swirled together for millions of years. In such mergers, the original galaxies are often stretched and pulled apart as they wrap around a common center of gravity. After a few back-and-forths, this starry tempest settles down into a new, round object. The now subdued celestial body is technically known as an elliptical galaxy. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "During a recent close flyby of the gas giant Jupiter, our Juno spacecraft (@nasajuno) captured this stunning series of i" - 1721401951689449113
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During a recent close flyby of the gas giant Jupiter, our Juno spacecraft (@nasajuno) captured this stunning series of images showing swirling cloud patterns on the planet’s south pole. At first glance, the series might appear to be the same image repeated. But closer inspection reveals slight changes, which are most easily noticed by comparing the far-left image with the far-right image. Directly, the images show Jupiter. But, through slight variations in the images, they indirectly capture the motion of the Juno spacecraft itself, once again swinging around a giant planet hundreds of millions of miles from Earth. Juno captured this color-enhanced time-lapse sequence of images on Feb. 7 between 10:21 a.m. and 11:01 a.m. EST. At the time, the spacecraft was between 85,292 to 124,856 miles (137,264 to 200,937 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet with the images centered on latitudes from 84.1 to 75.5 degrees south. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt

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This animation blinks between two images of our Mars Phoenix Lander. The first – dark smudges on the planet’s surface. The second – the same Martian terrain nearly a decade later, covered in dust. Our Mars orbiter captured this shot as it surveyed the planet from orbit: the first in 2008. The second: late 2017. In August 2008, Phoenix completed its three-month mission studying Martian ice, soil and atmosphere. The lander worked for two additional months before reduced sunlight caused energy to become insufficient to keep the lander functioning. The solar-powered robot was not designed to survive through the dark and cold conditions of a Martian arctic winter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

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Sputters and spurts on the Sun’s only visible active region eventually unleashed this brief, bright flare on Feb. 7. The flare appears about mid-way through the half-day clip. Normally, we do not pay much attention to flares this small, but it was just about the only real solar activity over the week around Feb. 7 as the Sun is slowing approaching its quiet period of the 11-year solar cycle. These images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Credit: NASA/SDO

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "Our Sun was caught peaking over Earth’s arch and stretching its glorious light across the South Pacific on Feb. 16. Astr" - 1718627583339070852
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Our Sun was caught peaking over Earth’s arch and stretching its glorious light across the South Pacific on Feb. 16. Astronaut Scott Tingle captured this beaming moment while aboard the International Space Station (@iss), which can also be spotted in the glow of daybreak. He posted the moment to social media with the modest caption, “Sunrise over the South Pacific.” The International Space Station and its crew orbit Earth from an altitude of 250 miles, traveling at a speed of approximately 17,500 miles per hour. Because the station completes each trip around the globe in about 92 minutes, the crew experiences 16 sunrises and sunsets each day! Six humans are currently living and working on the International Space Station conducting important science and research that will not only benefit life here on Earth, but will help us venture deeper into space than ever before. As of last week, the latest crew members had completed more than 100 hours of science, breaking the record for hours of research conducted. Credit: NASA/Scott Tingle

image by NASA (@nasa) with caption : "Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! Several stars and distant galaxies are visible in this Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble" - 1717846712382175964
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Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! Several stars and distant galaxies are visible in this Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) view of a galaxy cluster. The light from the galaxies in the cluster has become redshifted by the expansion of space, making them appear redder than they actually are. By measuring the amount of redshift, we know that it took more than 5 billion years for the light from this galaxy cluster to reach us. The light of the galaxies in the background had to travel even longer than that, making this image an extremely old window into the far reaches of the universe. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS